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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012, Article ID 232464, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/232464
Review Article

Cell Stress Proteins in Atherothrombosis

Vascular Research Laboratory, IIS-Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain

Received 30 March 2012; Accepted 14 May 2012

Academic Editor: Ana Fortuno

Copyright © 2012 Julio Madrigal-Matute et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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