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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 768101, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/768101
Research Article

A Nonpolar Blueberry Fraction Blunts NADPH Oxidase Activation in Neuronal Cells Exposed to Tumor Necrosis Factor-α

1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 900 Yukon Drive, REIC 194, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
2Chemistry Department, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA

Received 25 May 2011; Revised 16 September 2011; Accepted 11 November 2011

Academic Editor: Qingping Feng

Copyright © 2012 Sally J. Gustafson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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