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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 487534, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/487534
Review Article

Neurodegeneration in Friedreich’s Ataxia: From Defective Frataxin to Oxidative Stress

1Instituto Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, 2784-505 Oeiras, Portugal
2Development of the Nervous System, IBENS, Ecole Normale Supérieure, 46 rue d’Ulm, 75230 Paris Cedex 05, France

Received 26 May 2013; Accepted 14 June 2013

Academic Editor: Anne-Laure Bulteau

Copyright © 2013 Cláudio M. Gomes and Renata Santos. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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