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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 831969, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/831969
Research Article

Xenobiotic Sensor- and Metabolism-Related Gene Variants in Environmental Sensitivity-Related Illnesses: A Survey on the Italian Population

1Department of Biomedical Sciences and Morpho-Functional Imaging, Polyclinic University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
2Laboratory of Tissue Engineering and Skin Pathophysiology, Dermatology Institute (IDI IRCCS), Via Monti di Creta 104, 00167 Rome, Italy
32nd Dermatology Division, Dermatology Institute (IDI IRCCS), 00167 Rome, Italy

Received 4 March 2013; Accepted 19 May 2013

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Valacchi

Copyright © 2013 Daniela Caccamo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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