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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 839409, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/839409
Review Article

Mechanisms of Nrf2/Keap1-Dependent Phase II Cytoprotective and Detoxifying Gene Expression and Potential Cellular Targets of Chemopreventive Isothiocyanates

College of Pharmacy, Dongguk University, 813-4 Siksa-dong, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do 410-820, Republic of Korea

Received 10 January 2013; Accepted 6 May 2013

Academic Editor: Hye-Youn Cho

Copyright © 2013 Biswa Nath Das et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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