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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 932472, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/932472
Research Article

Thiol Redox Sensitivity of Two Key Enzymes of Heme Biosynthesis and Pentose Phosphate Pathways: Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase and Transketolase

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Córdoba and Córdoba Maimónides Institute for Biomedical Research (IMIBIC), 14071 Córdoba, Spain
2Department of Musculoskeletal Biology, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease (IACD), University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GA, UK
3Molecular Signaling and Antioxidant Systems in Plants, Department of Experimental Biology, University of Jaén, 23071 Jaén, Spain

Received 24 April 2013; Revised 10 June 2013; Accepted 19 June 2013

Academic Editor: Paula Ludovico

Copyright © 2013 Brian McDonagh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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