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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014, Article ID 457429, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/457429
Research Article

Exercise Training Preserves Ischemic Preconditioning in Aged Rat Hearts by Restoring the Myocardial Polyamine Pool

1Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, No. 157 Baojian Road, Nangang District, Harbin 150086, China
2Department of Pathology, Heilongjiang Electric Power Hospital, Harbin 150090, China
3Department of Pathophysiology, Qiqihar Medical University, Qiqihar 161006, China
4Department of Cardiology, The First Clinical Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001, China

Received 2 July 2014; Revised 6 September 2014; Accepted 21 September 2014; Published 23 October 2014

Academic Editor: Vittorio Calabrese

Copyright © 2014 Weiwei Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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