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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014, Article ID 481482, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/481482
Review Article

The Emerging Role of TR 1 in Cardiac Repair: Potential Therapeutic Implications

Department of Pharmacology, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Avenue, Goudi, 11527 Athens, Greece

Received 8 November 2013; Accepted 31 December 2013; Published 9 February 2014

Academic Editor: Neelam Khaper

Copyright © 2014 Constantinos Pantos and Iordanis Mourouzis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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