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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014, Article ID 735618, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/735618
Research Article

PRAK Interacts with DJ-1 and Prevents Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death

1State Key Laboratory of Organ Failure Research, Key Laboratory of Transcriptomics and Proteomics, Ministry of Education of China, Key Laboratory of Proteomics of Guangdong Province, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China
2Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China
3Department of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland

Received 23 May 2014; Accepted 27 August 2014; Published 14 October 2014

Academic Editor: Ozcan Erel

Copyright © 2014 Jing Tang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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