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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014, Article ID 823071, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/823071
Research Article

Endogenous Ceramide Contributes to the Transcytosis of oxLDL across Endothelial Cells and Promotes Its Subendothelial Retention in Vascular Wall

1Department of Pharmacology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China
2The Key Laboratory of Drug Target Research and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation of Hubei Province, Wuhan 430030, China

Received 13 February 2014; Revised 17 March 2014; Accepted 21 March 2014; Published 10 April 2014

Academic Editor: Shiwei Deng

Copyright © 2014 Wenjing Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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