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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 121925, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/121925
Research Article

Choline and Cystine Deficient Diets in Animal Models with Hepatocellular Injury: Evaluation of Oxidative Stress and Expression of RAGE, TNF-α, and IL-1β

1Faculdade de Nutrição, Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Campus A. C. Simões, Avenida Lourival Melo Mota, S/N, Tabuleiro dos Martins, 57072-970 Maceió, AL, Brazil
2Instituto de Química e Biotecnologia (IQB), Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Avenida Lourival Melo Mota, s/n, Cidade Universitária, 57072-900 Maceió, AL, Brazil
3Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia de Alagoas, 57020-600 Maceió, AL, Brazil
4Programa de Pós Graduação em Ciências da Saúde (PPGCS), Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Campus A. C. Simões, Avenida Lourival Melo Mota, s/n, Tabuleiro dos Martins, 57072-970 Maceió, AL, Brazil
5Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió, AL, Brazil
6Centro de Estudos em Estresse Oxidativo (CEEO), Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde (ICBS), Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600 Anexo, Santana, 90035003 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
7INCT de Bioanalítica, UNICAMP, 13083-861 Campinas, SP, Brazil

Received 17 November 2014; Revised 15 May 2015; Accepted 18 May 2015

Academic Editor: Matthew C. Zimmerman

Copyright © 2015 Juliana Célia F. Santos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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