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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 204615, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/204615
Research Article

Assessment of Eccentric Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Using Oxidation-Reduction Potential Markers

1Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Thessaly, Ploutonos 26 & Aiolou, 41221 Larissa, Greece
2Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Thessaly, 42100 Trikala, Greece
3Trauma Research Department, St. Anthony Hospital, Lakewood, CO 80228, USA
4Trauma Research Department, Swedish Medical Center, Englewood, CO 80113, USA
5Trauma Research Department, Medical Center of Plano, Plano, TX 75075, USA

Received 27 November 2014; Revised 3 February 2015; Accepted 4 February 2015

Academic Editor: P. Venditti

Copyright © 2015 Dimitrios Stagos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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