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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 217304, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/217304
Research Article

Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Enhances the Therapeutic Effects of Leptomycin B on Human Lung Cancer A549 Cells

Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA

Received 30 December 2014; Revised 16 March 2015; Accepted 17 March 2015

Academic Editor: Thomas Kietzmann

Copyright © 2015 Meghan M. Cromie and Weimin Gao. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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