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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 267027, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/267027
Research Article

Metallothionein-I/II Knockout Mice Aggravate Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Peroxiredoxin 3 Expression in Thyroid after Excessive Iodide Exposure

1Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China
2Key Lab of Hormones and Development of Ministry of Health, Institute of Endocrinology, Metabolic Disease Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China

Received 24 October 2014; Revised 13 January 2015; Accepted 11 February 2015

Academic Editor: Kaushik Biswas

Copyright © 2015 Na Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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