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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 309169, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/309169
Research Article

The Effect of Age on Osteogenic and Adipogenic Differentiation Potential of Human Adipose Derived Stromal Stem Cells (hASCs) and the Impact of Stress Factors in the Course of the Differentiation Process

1Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-631 Wroclaw, Poland
2Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, 54-066 Wroclaw, Poland
3Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 31-034 Krakow, Poland
4Department of Animal Physiology and Biostructure, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-375 Wroclaw, Poland

Received 8 March 2015; Revised 2 June 2015; Accepted 18 June 2015

Academic Editor: Peter Backx

Copyright © 2015 Katarzyna Kornicka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Human adipose tissue is a great source of autologous mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs), which are recognized for their vast therapeutic applications. Their ability to self-renew and differentiate into several lineages makes them a promising tool for cell-based therapies in different types of degenerative diseases. Thus it is crucial to evaluate age-related changes in hASCs, as the elderly are a group that will benefit most from their considerable potential. In this study we investigated the effect of donor age on growth kinetics, cellular senescence marker levels, and osteogenic and adipogenic potential of hASCs. It also has been known that, during life, organisms accumulate oxidative damage that negatively affects cell metabolism. Taking this into consideration, we evaluated the levels of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, and superoxide dismutase activity. We observed that ROS and NO increase with aging, while SOD activity is significantly reduced. Moreover cells obtained from older patients displayed senescence associated features, for example, β-galactosidase activity, enlarged morphology, and p53 protein upregulation. All of those characteristics seem to contribute to decreased proliferation potential of those cells. Our results suggest that due to aging some cellular modification may be required before applying aged cells efficiently in therapies such as tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.