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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 454659, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/454659
Review Article

Oxidative Stress Responses and NRF2 in Human Leukaemia

1Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UQ, UK
2Department of Molecular & Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
3Department of Haematology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals National Health Service Trust, Norwich NR4 7UY, UK

Received 11 December 2014; Revised 15 March 2015; Accepted 20 March 2015

Academic Editor: Victor M. Victor

Copyright © 2015 Amina Abdul-Aziz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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