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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 482582, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/482582
Review Article

Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling: Triggers, Pathways, and Outcomes

1Departamento de Bioquímica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, 04044-020 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 2 April 2015; Revised 8 May 2015; Accepted 13 May 2015

Academic Editor: Adriana Maria Cassina

Copyright © 2015 Fernanda Marques da Cunha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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