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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 498401, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/498401
Review Article

Electron Transport Disturbances and Neurodegeneration: From Albert Szent-Györgyi’s Concept (Szeged) till Novel Approaches to Boost Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

1Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Albert Szent-Györgyi Clinical Center, University of Szeged, Semmelweis u. 6, Szeged 6725, Hungary
2Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Neuroscience, University of Szeged, Közép Fasor 52, Szeged 6726, Hungary
3MTA-SZTE Neuroscience Research Group, Semmelweis u. 6, Szeged 6725, Hungary

Received 6 March 2015; Accepted 15 April 2015

Academic Editor: José Pedraza-Chaverri

Copyright © 2015 Levente Szalárdy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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