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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 543134, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/543134
Research Article

Hyperhomocysteinemia and MTHFR Polymorphisms as Antenatal Risk Factors of White Matter Abnormalities in Two Cohorts of Late Preterm and Full Term Newborns

1Department of Pediatric, Gynecological, Microbiological and Biomedical Sciences, Unit of Neonatal Intensive Care, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
2Department of Pediatric, Gynecological, Microbiological and Biomedical Sciences, Unit of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
3Department of Pediatric, Gynecological, Microbiological and Biomedical Sciences, Unit of Pediatric Genetics and Immunology, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
4Department of Economical, Business and Environmental Sciences and Quantitative Methods, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
5Department of Biomedical Sciences and Morpho-Functional Imaging, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
6Department of Pediatric, Gynecological, Microbiological and Biomedical Sciences, Unit of Neonatology, University of Messina, Messina, Italy

Received 2 October 2014; Revised 29 January 2015; Accepted 29 January 2015

Academic Editor: Felipe Dal-Pizzol

Copyright © 2015 Lucia M. Marseglia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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