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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 609053, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/609053
Research Article

Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Redox Status of the Aortic Wall in Young Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

1Department of Physiology, Medical University, 1 Kliment Ohridski, 5800 Pleven, Bulgaria
2Department of Biology, Medical University, 1 Kliment Ohridski, 5800 Pleven, Bulgaria
3Department of Common and Clinical Pathology, Medical University, 1 Kliment Ohridski, 5800 Pleven, Bulgaria
4Institute of Biology and Immunology of Reproduction, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 73 Tsarigradsko Shose, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria
5Department of Biophysics, Medical University, 1 Kliment Ohridski, 5800 Pleven, Bulgaria
6Central Clinical Laboratory of University Hospital, 8 Georgi Kochev, 5800 Pleven, Bulgaria
7Department of Pathological Physiology, Medical University, 1 Kliment Ohridski, 5800 Pleven, Bulgaria

Received 18 December 2014; Revised 23 February 2015; Accepted 10 March 2015

Academic Editor: Xinchun Pi

Copyright © 2015 Boryana Ruseva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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