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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 730683, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/730683
Research Article

Sca-1+ Cells from Fetal Heart with High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Exhibit Enhanced Gene Expression for Self-Renewal, Proliferation, and Survival

1Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
2Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
3Division of Hypertension and Vascular Research, Department of Internal Medicine, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI 48202, USA
4Cellular and Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI 48202, USA
5Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
6Department of Physiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202, USA

Received 26 November 2014; Revised 5 February 2015; Accepted 6 February 2015

Academic Editor: Francisco Javier Romero

Copyright © 2015 Devaveena Dey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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