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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 795602, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/795602
Review Article

Chemotherapy-Induced Cardiotoxicity: Overview of the Roles of Oxidative Stress

Siriraj Center of Excellence for Stem Cell Research, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand

Received 18 December 2014; Accepted 17 May 2015

Academic Editor: Raj Soorappan

Copyright © 2015 Paweorn Angsutararux et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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