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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 1069743, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1069743
Review Article

Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

1Institute of Biochemistry, Medical Faculty Pristina, Kosovska Mitrovica 38220, Serbia
2Institute of Pharmacology, Medical Faculty Pristina, Kosovska Mitrovica 38220, Serbia
3Institute of Pathophysiology, Medical Faculty Pristina, Kosovska Mitrovica 38220, Serbia

Received 11 February 2016; Accepted 14 March 2016

Academic Editor: Alexandra Scholze

Copyright © 2016 Bojana Kisic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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