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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 1245049, 44 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1245049
Review Article

Role of ROS and RNS Sources in Physiological and Pathological Conditions

1Dipartimento di Biologia, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, 80126 Napoli, Italy
2Department of Chemistry, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY 40475, USA
3Service of Endocrinology, University Hospital Dr. Peset, Foundation for the Promotion of Health and Biomedical Research in the Valencian Region (FISABIO), 46010 Valencia, Spain

Received 1 December 2015; Revised 4 May 2016; Accepted 23 May 2016

Academic Editor: Rodrigo Franco

Copyright © 2016 Sergio Di Meo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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