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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1580967, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1580967
Review Article

Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate T Cell Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

1Biotherapy Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052, China
2Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052, China
3Department of Hematology/Oncology, School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60201, USA
4School of Life Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052, China
5Engineering Key Laboratory for Cell Therapy of Henan Province, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052, China

Received 18 March 2016; Revised 6 June 2016; Accepted 30 June 2016

Academic Editor: Svetlana Karakhanova

Copyright © 2016 Xinfeng Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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