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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2158971, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2158971
Research Article

Estrogen Replacement Reduces Oxidative Stress in the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla of Ovariectomized Rats

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China
2Department of Physiology, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China

Received 15 May 2015; Accepted 6 July 2015

Academic Editor: Pál Pacher

Copyright © 2016 Fan Hao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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