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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 2696952, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2696952
Research Article

Inhibition of the RhoA GTPase Activity Increases Sensitivity of Melanoma Cells to UV Radiation Effects

1Laboratory of Signaling in Biomolecular Systems, Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Sao Paulo, 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Centro de Oncologia Molecular, Hospital Sirio Libanes, 01308-060 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
3Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR), 01509-010 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 3 September 2015; Accepted 25 October 2015

Academic Editor: Tanea T. Reed

Copyright © 2016 Gisele Espinha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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