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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2746457, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2746457
Review Article

NRF2, a Key Regulator of Antioxidants with Two Faces towards Cancer

1Department of Pathology, College of Korean Medicine, Dongguk University, Donggukro 32, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do 10326, Republic of Korea
2College of Pharmacy, Dongguk University, Donggukro 32, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do 10326, Republic of Korea

Received 24 March 2016; Accepted 10 May 2016

Academic Editor: Mikko O. Laukkanen

Copyright © 2016 Jaieun Kim and Young-Sam Keum. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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