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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 2756068, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2756068
Review Article

It Is All about (U)biquitin: Role of Altered Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and UCHL1 in Alzheimer Disease

1Department of Biochemical Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
2Facultad de Salud, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Providencia, Santiago, Chile
3Department of Chemistry, Sanders-Brown Center of Aging, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, USA

Received 2 October 2015; Accepted 26 November 2015

Academic Editor: Gerasimos Sykiotis

Copyright © 2016 Antonella Tramutola et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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