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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 2795090, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2795090
Review Article

The Reactive Oxygen Species in Macrophage Polarization: Reflecting Its Dual Role in Progression and Treatment of Human Diseases

1School of Chinese Medicine, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
2Laboratory of Chinese Herbal Pharmacology, Renmin Hospital, Hubei 442000, China
3Hubei Key Laboratory of Wudang Local Chinese Medicine Research, Hubei University of Medicine, Hubei 442000, China

Received 24 December 2015; Revised 13 March 2016; Accepted 15 March 2016

Academic Editor: Paola Venditti

Copyright © 2016 Hor-Yue Tan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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