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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 2840643, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2840643
Clinical Study

Evidence of a Redox-Dependent Regulation of Immune Responses to Exercise-Induced Inflammation

1Department of Clinical Therapeutics, Medical School, University of Athens, 11527 Athens, Greece
2School of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Thessaly, Karies, 42100 Trikala, Greece
3School of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Democritus University of Thrace, 69100 Komotini, Greece
4Department of Toxicology, Medical School, University of Athens, 11527 Athens, Greece
5Department of Clinical Biochemistry, “Aghia Sophia” Children’s Hospital, 11527 Athens, Greece
6School of Physical Education and Sport Science, University of Athens, Athens, Greece

Received 14 May 2016; Accepted 21 September 2016

Academic Editor: Victor M. Victor

Copyright © 2016 Alexandra Sakelliou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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