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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 3686829, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3686829
Research Article

SOD1 Overexpression Preserves Baroreflex Control of Heart Rate with an Increase of Aortic Depressor Nerve Function

1Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA
2Department of Anesthesia, University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA

Received 24 July 2015; Accepted 1 October 2015

Academic Editor: Wei-Zhong Wang

Copyright © 2016 Jeffrey Hatcher et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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