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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 4085727, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4085727
Research Article

Coordinated Upregulation of Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Autophagy in Breast Cancer Cells: The Role of Dynamin Related Protein-1 and Implication for Breast Cancer Treatment

1Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Fralin Life Science Institute, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
3Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
4Department of Statistics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA

Received 13 May 2016; Revised 12 August 2016; Accepted 23 August 2016

Academic Editor: Ajit Vikram

Copyright © 2016 Peng Zou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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