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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 4723416, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4723416
Review Article

Epithelial Electrolyte Transport Physiology and the Gasotransmitter Hydrogen Sulfide

1Institute for Veterinary Physiology and Biochemistry, Justus-Liebig University, Frankfurter Strasse 100, 35392 Giessen, Germany
2Institute for Animal Physiology, Justus-Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26, 35392 Giessen, Germany

Received 29 October 2015; Accepted 17 December 2015

Academic Editor: Yi C. Zhu

Copyright © 2016 Ervice Pouokam and Mike Althaus. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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