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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 4782426, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4782426
Research Article

Oxidative Stress in Cancer-Prone Genetic Diseases in Pediatric Age: The Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

1Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy
2UOC Patologia Clinica, AOUS Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy

Received 18 March 2016; Accepted 10 April 2016

Academic Editor: Gabriele Saretzki

Copyright © 2016 Serafina Perrone et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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