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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 5763743, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5763743
Research Article

Immediate Remote Ischemic Postconditioning Reduces Brain Nitrotyrosine Formation in a Piglet Asphyxia Model

1Preclinical Neonatal Neuroprotection Group, UCL EGA Institute for Women’s Health, London WC1E 6BT, UK
2Department of Pharmacology, UCL School of Pharmacy, London WC1N 1AX, UK
3Perinatal Brain Group, UCL EGA Institute for Women’s Health, London WC1E 6HX, UK

Received 22 January 2016; Revised 21 March 2016; Accepted 27 March 2016

Academic Editor: Serafina Perrone

Copyright © 2016 Eridan Rocha-Ferreira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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