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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 6475624, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6475624
Review Article

Polyphenols as Modulator of Oxidative Stress in Cancer Disease: New Therapeutic Strategies

Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, 00144 Rome, Italy

Received 22 May 2015; Accepted 21 July 2015

Academic Editor: Amit Tyagi

Copyright © 2016 Anna Maria Mileo and Stefania Miccadei. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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