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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 7364138, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7364138
Review Article

Targeting Nitric Oxide with Natural Derived Compounds as a Therapeutic Strategy in Vascular Diseases

1IRCCS Neuromed, Vascular Physiopathology Unit, Pozzilli, Italy
2Università degli Studi di Salerno, Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry, Baronissi, Italy
3IRCCS Multimedica, Milan, Italy
4Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy

Received 29 April 2016; Revised 30 July 2016; Accepted 1 August 2016

Academic Editor: Yong Ji

Copyright © 2016 Maurizio Forte et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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