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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 7420637, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7420637
Review Article

Relationship between Oxidative Stress, Circadian Rhythms, and AMD

1Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de México, DF, Mexico
2Posgrado en Ciencias Cognitivas, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Facultad de Humanidades, UAEM, Avenida Universidad No. 1001, Colonia Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, MOR, Mexico

Received 7 September 2015; Revised 24 October 2015; Accepted 26 October 2015

Academic Editor: Paola Venditti

Copyright © 2016 María Luisa Fanjul-Moles and Germán Octavio López-Riquelme. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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