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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 7498528, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7498528
Review Article

Nutrients, Microglia Aging, and Brain Aging

1Department of Aging Science and Pharmacology, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan
2Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730, China
3Institution of Geriatric Qinghai Provincial Hospital, Xining 810007, China

Received 25 September 2015; Revised 21 December 2015; Accepted 31 December 2015

Academic Editor: Trevor A. Mori

Copyright © 2016 Zhou Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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