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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 7682960, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7682960
Review Article

Therapy Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Ischemic Stroke

Department of Neurology, The Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province 221006, China

Received 8 January 2016; Accepted 25 February 2016

Academic Editor: Ryuichi Morishita

Copyright © 2016 Xinchun Ye et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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