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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 8026702, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8026702
Research Article

Targeting TRPM2 Channels Impairs Radiation-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Fosters Cell Death of T Cell Leukemia Cells in a Bcl-2-Dependent Manner

1Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
2Department of Physiology, University of Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
3Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
4Institute for Cell Biology (Cancer Research), University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45122 Essen, Germany

Received 22 June 2015; Accepted 15 October 2015

Academic Editor: Lokesh Deb

Copyright © 2016 Dominik Klumpp et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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