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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 8296150, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8296150
Research Article

Proliferation of Human Primary Myoblasts Is Associated with Altered Energy Metabolism in Dependence on Ageing In Vivo and In Vitro

1Institute of Biomedicine and Translational Medicine, University of Tartu, Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu, Estonia
2Department of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, Tartu University Hospital, L. Puusepa 8, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
3Department of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, University of Tartu, L. Puusepa 8, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
4Institute of Exercise Biology and Physiotherapy, University of Tartu, Ravila 14a, 50411 Tartu, Estonia

Received 24 September 2015; Accepted 8 December 2015

Academic Editor: Rebeca Acín-Pérez

Copyright © 2016 Reedik Pääsuke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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