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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8360738, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8360738
Research Article

AP39, a Mitochondria-Targeted Hydrogen Sulfide Donor, Supports Cellular Bioenergetics and Protects against Alzheimer’s Disease by Preserving Mitochondrial Function in APP/PS1 Mice and Neurons

1Experimental Research Center, Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China
2Department of Neurology, The University-Town Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China

Received 10 November 2015; Revised 11 December 2015; Accepted 15 December 2015

Academic Editor: David Sebastián

Copyright © 2016 Feng-li Zhao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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