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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9579868, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9579868
Review Article

The Janus-Faced Role of Antioxidants in Cancer Cachexia: New Insights on the Established Concepts

EA1274 Laboratory “Movement, Sport and Health Sciences” (M2S), University of Rennes 2, ENS Rennes, 35170 Bruz, France

Received 10 March 2016; Revised 28 June 2016; Accepted 17 July 2016

Academic Editor: Alexandr V. Bazhin

Copyright © 2016 Mohamad Assi and Amélie Rébillard. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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