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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9802136, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9802136
Research Article

Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Carotid Body Chemosensory Potentiation and Hypertension Are Critically Dependent on Peroxynitrite Formation

1Laboratorio de Neurobiología, Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 8330025 Santiago, Chile
2Centro de Investigación Biomédica, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, 8900000 Santiago, Chile
3Dirección de Investigación, Universidad Científica del Sur, Lima, Peru

Received 12 August 2015; Revised 22 September 2015; Accepted 27 September 2015

Academic Editor: Hanjun Wang

Copyright © 2016 Esteban A. Moya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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