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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 1670815, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1670815
Review Article

DNA Methylation and the Potential Role of Methyl-Containing Nutrients in Cardiovascular Diseases

1Key Laboratory of Agro-Ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Engineering Laboratory for Pollution Control and Waste Utilization in Livestock and Poultry Production, Hunan Provincial Engineering Research Center of Healthy Livestock, Hunan Co-Innovation Center of Animal Production Safety, Hunan 410125, China
2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
3State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
4College of Packaging and Printing Engineering, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300222, China
5Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, MSC08 4670, Fitz 258, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
6Animal Nutrition and Human Health Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081, China
7College of Animal Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Wenkai Ren; moc.621@91iaknewner and Jun Liang; nc.ude.tsut@8111gnailj

Received 27 March 2017; Accepted 31 October 2017; Published 16 November 2017

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Cirillo

Copyright © 2017 Gang Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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