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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 2062384, 21 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2062384
Review Article

Long Noncoding RNAs and RNA-Binding Proteins in Oxidative Stress, Cellular Senescence, and Age-Related Diseases

1Department of Biochemistry, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul 06591, Republic of Korea
2Department of Molecular Medicine and Hypoxia-Related Disease Research Center, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon 22212, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Eun Kyung Lee; rk.ca.cilohtac@keeel and Jae-Seon Lee; rk.ca.ahni@eelseaj

Received 23 February 2017; Revised 27 April 2017; Accepted 6 June 2017; Published 25 July 2017

Academic Editor: Domenico D'Arca

Copyright © 2017 Chongtae Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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