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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 2181942, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2181942
Research Article

Benign Effect of Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field on Brain Plasticity Assessed by Nitric Oxide Metabolism during Poststroke Rehabilitation

1Department of General Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Pomorska 141/143, Lodz, Poland
2Department of Medical Biochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, Mazowiecka 6/8, Lodz, Poland
3Department of Physical Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Pl. Hallera 1, Lodz, Poland
4Neurorehabilitation Ward, III General Hospital in Lodz, Milionowa 14, Lodz, Poland
5Department of Molecular Genetics, Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Lodz, Pomorska 141/143, Lodz, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Natalia Cichoń; lp.zdol.inu.loib@nohcic.ailatan

Received 12 May 2017; Revised 2 July 2017; Accepted 14 August 2017; Published 12 September 2017

Academic Editor: Tanea T. Reed

Copyright © 2017 Natalia Cichoń et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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