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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 2597581, 18 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2597581
Review Article

Oxidative Stress Gene Expression Profile Correlates with Cancer Patient Poor Prognosis: Identification of Crucial Pathways Might Select Novel Therapeutic Approaches

Experimental Pharmacology Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione G. Pascale-IRCCS, Naples, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Alessandra Leone; ti.an.iromutotutitsi@enoel.a

Received 15 March 2017; Accepted 30 May 2017; Published 9 July 2017

Academic Editor: Lars Bräutigam

Copyright © 2017 Alessandra Leone et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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